Summer scholars presentation series, part III

Though we weren’t able to meet in-person for JASP this year, our faculty, graduates, and undergraduate students at UNC are keeping up the scholarship and excitement that are hallmarks of our programming. Led by Dr. Inger Brodey, undergraduate students in ENGL 235: Studies in Jane Austen prepared presentations on specific aspects of Jane Austen’s works and world. We’ve curated them here on our blog, in the hopes that they make the months until our program next June seem just a little shorter.

The third of four posts in our Summer Scholars Presentation Series, this installment features three presentations on Illness, Hospitality, and Letters (respectively) in Jane Austen’s novels and time, with additional Q&A from Graduate Research Consultant Anne Fertig.


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A recurring theme in Jane Austen’s life and novels, illnesses often reveal much about the temperaments of her characters. UNC undergraduate Lauren Greenspahn goes a step further in her presentation, considering the differences between feigned and real illnesses, and their effects on Austen’s heroines.


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Digging into the social norms and customs surrounding house visits in the regency era, UNC undergraduate Jacob Thomas contemplates the relationships between reputation and the length of a visit in Austen’s novels.


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Comparing the writing styles of different male characters in Austen’s novels, this presentation from UNC undergraduate Khaki Loughran shows that you can tell a lot more than someone’s occupation from their handwriting.

Summer scholars presentation series, part II

As any Janeite knows, the study of Jane Austen and her work is never truly over. With the help of our UNC undergraduates enrolled in ENGL 235: Studies in Jane Austen, led by Dr. Inger Brodey, we’ve prepared a series of presentations on topics ranging from courtship to carriages to help you continue exploring Jane Austen’s world!

The second of four posts in our Summer Scholars Presentation Series, this installment features two presentations on Dress and Ornament (respectively) in Jane Austen’s novels and time, with additional Q&A from Graduate Research Consultant Anne Fertig.


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Permeated with symbols of status, wealth, and character, clothing was just as laden with meaning for Austen as it is today. Join UNC undergraduate Jacynta Smith as she investigates the nuances of attire and class in Austen’s novels.


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Marilyn Monroe says diamonds are a girl’s best friend, but were they Austen’s? Find out more about jewelry and ornament with UNC undergraduate Ellen Hu!

Summer scholars presentation series, part I

Are you missing the engaging and creative context corners that our graduate students put on every year at the Jane Austen Summer Program? Yeah, we are too. However, we might just have the cure for your Austen withdrawals: While this year’s JASP was postponed, the corresponding UNC Summer School course (ENGL 235: Studies in Jane Austen), led by JASP co-founder Dr. Inger Brodey, went on full speed ahead. After five weeks of reading Austen and conducting their own research, students created their own amazing presentations, which we recorded and are sharing just for you.

The first of four posts in our Summer Scholars Presentation Series, this installment features two presentations on instruments and accomplishments (respectively) in Jane Austen’s novels and time, with additional Q&A from graduate research consultant Anne Fertig.


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Have you ever wondered why Austen characters only seem to play pianoforte or harp? Or why no one could stand Mary Bennet’s performances? Find answers to these questions and more with UNC undergraduate Maggie Randall.


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We are all familiar with Mr. Darcy’s thoughts on female accomplishment — here’s a woman’s views on the subject. Look no further than this great presentation by UNC undergraduate Megan Britt.